A busy summer

Since it’s summer.

I’ve got a new day job and yeah, it puts me away from home pretty well. Footballers themselves are pretty busy this summer – Homare Sawa and Kensuke Nagai for Japan, Park Chu-Young for redemption, and Shinji Kagawa to prove his worth in Manchester United.

So far, so good for Japanese teams. Who would think that the women have the heavier burden, being world champions and yet still not favored to take the gold medals? Personally I’ll also go biting nails when they’ll face Brazil & USA, seeing how they have performed against Canada and Sweden.

On the other hand, the men might be able  handle Belarus in Quarter Finals. No one says that they are championship materials, but Spain were a championship material. On the other hand, Korea (there’s only one) will have a tough QF, whether against Senegal or the hosts.

Overall, this has been a great football at the Olympics for Japan and Republic of Korea. UAE’s per-emptive comment against British fairness made me missing Australia. As for that rogue state, I’ll just say – go them ’em, USA.

What else? Right, that Morganella’s tweet. The one where he called Koreans (or maybe specifically South Koreans, singling out North Koreans) as ‘mongoloids’. I learned that term in junior high social science, a remnant of colonial era teaching not yet erased in 1995 (maybe because it’s convenient, I don’t know). Journalists who are able to read French/German say it needs time and intimate knowledge of the latest European teen talk to decipher his tweet since it’s written in a youth’s text convention – slang, alternative spelling, and truncated grammar. I even have hard time understanding such tweets written in Indonesian.

The lesson is, the world still has plenty of people who don’t like Asians who are good at sports. Shinji Kagawa, now being the most high profile Asian footballer in Europe, faces this risk not only from random haters but also probably from other players – someone like Morganella. Speaking of random haters, now that a brat doesn’t hesitate to abuse a black Briton anymore, then what holds them from abusing an Asian? While Jeremy Lin has plenty of Asian-Americans, English-speaking Taiwanese, and others backing him, I don’t know how active the Japanese can be with Shinji. His porn actress (first I thought she’s just a gravure idol – a photo model acting cutely available instead of downward sexy, but no) girlfriend can be a two-edged blade – he shows that Asian male athletes can be sexually active, but also well, even Latino and black bad boys can go with lad magazine models and page 3 girls, but not a full-time porn star.

That’s all I got to say now. Tomorrow goal differences can decide the first or second place between Korea and Mexico, while Japan has a real test against Jerry Bengston’s Honduras. The First Class Pinks will win against South Africa, but they should win prettily. And Park Joo-Ho will face Molde in the Champions League.

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And they scored!

The sad thing was Manchester United lost. Because they were lost, nobody really remembered Park Ji-Sung equalizer. In the same night, my wish from the previous post came true – Shinji Kagawa scored two goals against Hoffenheim, and Mike Havenaar scored for Vitesse before PSV put an end to their hope of a comeback. Hajime Hosogai also helped Ausburg scoring equalizer against Kaiserslautern. The only dent was Koo and Hasebe’s inability to fight Bayern Munich.

Kagawa and Havenaar’s performance both grabbed modest attention in Japanese media on Sunday, as well as assorted sports site. Unfortunately, they play in Germany instead of England. In the rest of Southeast Asia there are raging debates every day on EPL clubs, while in Indonesia people abuse each other over Madrid v Barcelona, but no one watches Bundesliga, let alone Eredivisie.

On Sunday, however, the fortunes of the Koreans and the Japanese turned over. Nagatomo played full time in Inter’s suprise defeat to Lecce, Okazaki came in at the start of the second half but Stuttgart were badly damaged in the last ten minutes, Uchida played only for the first half and got a yellow card to boot (and Schalke was able to turn the table once he was gone), and Yoshida was helpless as RKC  mistreated VVV. Ji and Chu-Young spent the whole match again on the bench. Still, credit to Kawashima for clean sheet in away victory against Westerlo.

What’s the lesson? First, at least watching Japanese and Korean attackers are much less depressing than five years ago, when you got Takahara and Ahn and Seol and Lee Dong-Gook attempting to make a break in England and Germany. No, please don’t remind me on the last day of the Japanese in Serie A (I’m not talking about Yuto. I’m talking about Ogasawara, Yanagisawa, Oguro. And Morimoto). But as expected, their defensive sides, while have secured their names in starting XI, are still shaky. Even my favorite Lee Jung-Soo lapsed in the second half and almost letting go a three goals advantage as Al Sadd registered narrow 3-2 against Al Ahli in Qatar.

 

I think that’s all about Japan and Korea. Anyway, yesterday I found two names – first is Hiroshi Ibusuki, the current top scorer of Spain’s Segunda B Group 4. He plays for Sevilla B. A former youth player for Kashiwa, he has lived in Spain for three years and scored 35 goals. How about that, scoring 35 goals in Spain before you are 21 year old. In Japan U-23, however, he is still ranked behind Yamazaki, Nagai, Osako and Usami, just to name a few.

The second name is Xavier Chen, playing for Mechelen. I was wondering how could a Taiwanese playing in the Belgian Premier League, seeing that no Taiwanese plays even in Hong Kong First Division or J.League Division 2. Turned out he’s half-Belgian, the Taiwanese football federation claimed to know him when playing FIFA 12 (talking about scouting), and said that they had to race China which was also approaching Chen. I don’t think China is one of federations which are keen to naturalize foreign-born players, but let’s just leave the story like that.

On the other hand, Indonesians are in love with Radja Nainggolan, half-Indonesian Belgian midfielder playing for Cagliari, who was linked with Juventus, which is still a popular club in Indonesia. I’m glad that he has played twice for Belgium so Indonesian football federation cannot approach him for *sigh* naturalization. FYI, in FIFA 12 Chen is rated 67 while Nainggolan’s rating is 76, making him one of the top Asian players in the game, ethnically.

College Boys

At this hour, Malaysia U23 just won the final match in the Southeast Asian Games against Indonesia U23. It was the Young Tigers’ second victory against Indonesia in a week in Jakarta.

So, Malaysian senior and U23 teams have become Southeast Asia’s best, in both occasions, in Jakarta. Oh, I very much appreciate the great dedication and skills possessed by the Young Garudas.  But I am not down with their defeat for several reasons, some of them are subjective.

First, Malaysia are willing to employ ethnic minorities as coaches – Indian Krishnasamy Rajagopal in the senior team and Chinese Ong Kim Swee in the U23 team. I’m not for local coach by default. I’m against over-reliance on Western coaches. You get geniuses like Guus Hiddink (in both counts) and Alberto Zaccheroni and flops like Zico (well, he did very well with Kashima, I’m still unsure about Iraq), Ivica Osim (aah, this is undisputed), and assorted Middle Eastern coaches. The list includes current Indonesian coach Wim Rijsbergen.

Second, Indonesia does not include Chinese-German Kim Kurniawan, on the ground of fitness. But rumors have it that he was ousted because he plays for Persema Malang, a club that has disagreement with the Indonesian FA. On fairness, big credits for Indonesia are due for its shining Papuan forwards, Titus Bonai and Patrich Wanggai.  Ironically, in the match against Singapore, half of Indonesian players are Christians while almost all playing Singaporeans are Muslims. Still, it might be quite a while before Indonesia have its first Chinese player since 1970s. I don’t know if Malaysian Yong Kuong Yong and Singaporean Eugene Luo played even as substitutes, anyway. Singaporean chosen keeper was, er, Izwan Mahbud instead of Jasper Chan.

Third, the jingoism in Indonesian media was so annoying. All kinds of media jumped on it, to the point of launching racist and childish attacks on Malaysia simply because it sells. I just felt strongly that Harimau Muda are the better team and it’s nice to see that you’re right.

This week it’s the turn of the big boys of East Asia in the pre-Olympic tournament. Japan U23 will face Bahrain, South Korea and Australia take away trips to Qatar & Iraq respectively, and my, Malaysia to face Syria on Wednesday. Would they use this same team again?